Learning to navigate

14 Apr

Just before we knew we had to begin online teaching, I saw this tweet from Pernille Ripp:

Screen Shot 2020-04-14 at 5.47.11 AM

I took it to heart.

I mentioned it to my principal the day I went in to school to collect the materials I’d need for online teaching.

I mentioned it to my teaching partner and any other teacher I’ve spoken with.

I did two Webinars last week to learn more about online teaching and the presenter said the same thing.

As the expectations for teachers have shifted from two ungraded lessons a week to four lessons a week and 5 hours of “office time” with grading still TBD, I have held this idea in my heart and mind.

We have kids who have to share devices with siblings – maybe even parents.

We have kids with little quiet space in which to work.

We have to shift our perspective of what and how we teach.

So, thank you Pernille Ripp, for writing that Tweet. It has been my compass as we navigate these uncharted waters.

 

11 Responses to “Learning to navigate”

  1. Ms Victor Reads April 14, 2020 at 6:08 am #

    I always appreciate Pernille’s knack for keeping it real. The struggle is real and I still feel like we are trying to do too much (of not necessarily the right stuff).

  2. Maureen Ingram April 14, 2020 at 7:35 am #

    You are spot on – “We have to shift our perspective of what and how we teach.” I hope that each of us teacher writers will be able to document the issues and guide what is best for our students; I am hopeful, too, that this “time in the wilderness” due to pandemic might lead to serious reflection about what our education system is doing right and what needs to change.

  3. arjeha April 14, 2020 at 7:49 am #

    This is great advice and something I am sure not many people take into consideration. Devices are shared, a quiet space is not always available, and our expectations need to change along with these changing times.

  4. Dana Murphy April 14, 2020 at 8:13 am #

    I saw that tweet as well and also took it to heart.

  5. jumpofffindwings April 14, 2020 at 8:38 am #

    She has posted some powerful reminders lately. The one about her own struggle to read during this time was particularly poignant for me. I remember when my dad died, I lost the ability to read for almost a week. “You’re too sad, ” my husband soothed. “Just give it time.” We all need to embrace slow down.

  6. livinglife816287820 April 14, 2020 at 9:28 am #

    Yes, definitely the best advice, we have to be aware that our students are at home and not at school and it’s just not the same environment to get work done in.

  7. Elisabeth Ellington April 14, 2020 at 10:24 am #

    It’s so important to have a compass to navigate with right now, and this is a good one. I have tried to give my students a range of options so they can make choices about how much time and effort they can give to school right now. I want to be sure that those who want and need to be engaged for as many hours a week as they were before can be, and those who absolutely cannot be that engaged can streamline and prioritize. I also appreciate all that Pernille Ripp has been sharing about her own children’s learning at this time. It’s hard for everyone!

  8. Rita K. April 14, 2020 at 1:34 pm #

    …and thank you. I will be sharing this with teacher friends who are feeling overwhelmed!

  9. Anna Maria April 14, 2020 at 7:12 pm #

    This is very true. The first set of packets that were compiled on March 20th were entirely too much. This week I’ve e-mailed and mailed one reading worksheet a day that has five questions & a math project that will take them 2 weeks to work on. Nothing overwhelming just something fun and allows them to be creative. My students’ parents thanked me today. I thanked them in return for doing an awesome job at home with their kids. I know it’s all overwhelming and new to everyone.

  10. Susan Kennedy April 15, 2020 at 2:24 am #

    My friend Clare says that in these difficult times we should listen to those we have trusted before, going to the for our compass. That advice rings true. I have also heard that this is like the first six weeks of school. That feels right too.

    • Adrienne April 15, 2020 at 5:21 am #

      I keep telling my students about how much I am learning.

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